Coordinator, Ancient Near Eastern Studies
Professor of Ancient Scripture
Offices: 2015 HRCB (Kennedy Center); 365-F JSB
Phone: 801-422-3359
Email: eric_huntsman@byu.edu
Twitter: @EricDHuntsman

Classical Civiliation 363: Judaism and Christianity in the Classical Near East

Winter 2011

This course sets the development of Judaism and Early Christianity in the Near East in the historical and cultural context of the Hellenistic and Roman worlds, helping students understand how Jews and Christians encountered, accepted, and resisted Classical culture. In addition to providing students with a historical grounding, it will also expose them to extensive readings in important primary sources from the period—including the Apocrypha, Philo, Josephus, some of the New Testament, select apostolic fathers, and Eusebius—with the goal of better learning how to understand and evaluate these texts critically.

The first unit surveys Second Temple Judaism from the return from the Babylonian Exile until the end of the reign of the Hasmonean queen Alexandra. The second unit covers the period from Pompey’s intervention in 63 B.C. to the destruction of the Jerusalem Temple in A.D. 70. The final unit provides a briefer introduction to the period from A.D. 70 to Constantine, a subject regularly treated in greater detail in certain sections of Clscs 430R.

ClCv 363 Syllabus

Course Schedule

W 05 Jan
Course Introduction

  • Topics:
    Course overview and standards. Discussion of sources and methodology.

F 07 Jan
Jews and Persians

  • Topics:
    The effects of the Babylonian captivity; Cyrus Decree (538 B.C.; cf. Cyrus Cylinder) and Zerubabbel; Promulgation of Artazerxes I (458 B.C.) and Ezra; Nehemiah (432 B.C.); ‘am haggôlâ versus ‘am h ’ retz; Yehud under the Persians; temple and Torah. The Jewish periphery or "near Diaspora" in old Israel; the far Diaspora: the cases of Elephantine and Nippur. Johanan kills brother Yeshua, leading to Bagoses’ defilement of the temple; Manasseh marries daughter of Sanballat.
  • Readings:
    Ezra, Nehemiah (HCSB with intros, 646–79); Joseph. AJ. 11.1.1–5.8, 7.1–8.2 (§1–183, 297–312; Whiston, 359–83).
    JCWNT 16–20 - JCWNT,16-20.pdf; Bickerman, 26–50.

M 10 Jan
Jews and Alexander

  • Topics:
    A very brief sketch of Hellenic antecedents; overview of Alexander’s life and empire; Alexander at Jerusalem. Alexander remembered: applying Daniel’s prophecy. Hecataeus and the Jews.
  • Readings:
    Joseph. AJ. 11.8.3–7 (§313–7; Whiston, 383–86); "Pseudo" Hecataeus, intro and fragments 3–4 = Joseph. Ap. 1.22, 2.4 (OTP, 906–907, 913–918 = §1.183–205, 2.43; Whiston, 948–49, 962); Daniel 2:2–45, 8:1–27 (HCSB, 1171–73, 1184–86).
  • JCWNT, 27–32; Bickerman, 3–19; Cecilia M. Peek, Alexander the Great Comes to Jerusalem," BYU Studies 36.3 (1996–97): 99–112 (posted online).

W 12 Jan
The Struggle for Succession

  • Topic:
    “Native” resistance to Hellenism . . . and the exception among the Jews of Alexandria. The Greek Torah and the development of the Septuagint. Aristobolus and Greek philosophy. Romans and Hellenism.
  • Joseph. AJ. 12.2.115 (§11–118; Whiston, 388–95); Letter of Aristeas, OTP 2:7–33 (posted online; read intro and skim text); Aristobolus, intro and fragment 3 (OTP, 2:831–36, 841).
  • “Translating the Septuagint” JCWNT, 8; Bickerman, 81–89, 101–116; Melvin K. Peters, s.v., “Septuagint,” ABD 5:1093, 1096–97.; Helyer, 75–92; 276–287; NETS, xiv–xx (n.b. xvii–xviii), 1–5.

F 15 Jan
The Jews and Hellenism

  • Topics:
    Ptolemaic Alexandria and royal patronage. The Greek polis in a near eastern setting; case studies: Alexandia, Antioch, and Pergamum. Royal capitals and the government of Hellenistic states.
  • Readings:
    Green, 80–91, 155–70, 187–200; Ball, 150–161.

W 19 Jan
Josephus as a Source

  • Topics:
    Yosef ben Matthias ha-kohen—life, career, and writings. Critical evaluation of Josephus.
  • Readings:
    Joseph. Vit. 1–15, 74–76 (§1–83, 407–430; Whiston, 17–22, 41–42).
  • Eric D. Huntsman, “The Reliability of Josephus: Can He Be Trusted?” BYU Studies 36.3 (1996–7), 392–402; Helyer, 336–375.

Focus on Writing: Doing a Source Analysis.

M 29 Jan
Jews and the Ptolemies

  • Topics:
    Ptolemy II Soter and the First Syrian War (274–71 B.C.) with Antiochus I Soter; Ptolemy III Euergetes and Seleucus II Callinicus fight the Third Syrian War (246–41 B.C.) over Laodicea; Joseph son of Tobias prostates (243–218 B.C.); Judea under the Ptolemies and the Tobiads. Coele-Syria between Ptolemy IV Philapator and Antiochus III the Great during the Fourth Syrian War (219–217 B.C.). The Battle of Raphia.
  • Readings:
    Joseph. AJ. 12.4.1–11 (§154–236; Whiston, 398–402).
  • Bickerman, 69–80, 89–90; Green 137–54, 497–503, 506–508.

W 31 Jan
Apocrypha I

  • Topics: Jews and Gentiles, suffering and healing: the story of Tobit. Nothing to do with the Maccabees: Dositheus and Ptolemy IV Philopator in 3 Maccabees.
  • Readings:
    Tobit (HCSB with intro, 1293–1312); 3 Maccabees (HCSB with intro, 1573–1587); Joseph. Ap. 1.1 (§1–5; Whiston, 937) and 2.5 (§48–64, Whiston, 963–64).
  • Bickerman, 51–65.

F 02 Feb
Jews and the Seleucids

  • Topics:
    The anabasis of Antiochus III the Great (212–205 B.C.); Rome expells Antiochus III from Egypt, but he retakes and holds Coele-Syria (198 B.C.); Antiochus III defeated by Rome at Magnesia (189 B.C.). The Jerusalem temple and priesthood un the second century. Seleucus IV Philopator sends Heliodorus to Jerusalem (178 B.C.); Simon "the Just" dies, is succeed by "Jason" (176/5 B.C.); the Hellenization of Jerusalem (175–172/1 B.C.).
  • Readings:
    2 Maccabees 1:1–4:22 (HCSB with intro, 1519–26).
  • Bickerman, 91–93, 117–129, 133–47; Green, 503–512.

M 05 Feb
Apocrypha II and Pseudepigrapha

  • Topics:
    Scribes and Sages. The wisdom of Jesus son of Sirach. Judith and Holofernes. Jubilees, Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, and Jewish Orphica.
  • Readings:
    Sirach (HCSB with intro, 1378–1451); Judith (HCSB with intro, 1313–32).
  • Bickerman, 93–100, 161–91, 201–236.
  • jubilees pdf, orphica pdf, polyhistor pdf, testaments pdf

W 07 Feb
Hasmoneans I, Quiz I due

  • Topics:
    The "megalomania" of Antiochus IV Ephiphanes begins; Menelaus high priest by bribery (170 B.C.); Jerusalem Temple dedicated to Olympian Zeus (167 B.C.): the abomination of desolation? Akra built in Jerusalem; Mattathias and his sons begin the "Maccabean" Revolt; Temple rededicated, Antiochus IV dies in Media (164 B.C.); Death of Judas Maccaabeus, who is succeed by his brother Jonathan (160 B.C.); Jonathan becomes high priest (153/52 B.C.); Seleucid succession struggles; Simon becomes high priest and ethnarch (c. 142 B.C.).
  • Readings:b 2 Maccabees 4:23–7:42 (HCSB 1526–1533); Daniel 7:1–12:13 (HCSB with intro, 1168–69, 1182–92); 1 Maccabees (HCSB with intro, 1477–1518); Joseph. AJ. 12.5.1–13.7.4 (§12.237–13.229; Whiston, 403–435); cf. BJ 1.1.1–2.3 (§31–53; Whiston, 670–72).
  • JCWNT, 21-22; Green, 512–524, 533–34; Schürer, 1:125–229, 1:137-199. Hasmonean Family Tree

F 09 Feb
Hasmoneans II

  • Topics:
    John Hyrcanus, high priest and ethnarch (c. 134–104 B.C.); Samaritan temple destroyed, Idumea Judaized, Galilee "liberated" and/or colonized; the rise of Jewish sects–Sadducees, Pharisees, and Essenes; the rise of Jewish sects–Sadducees, Pharisees, and Essenes. Ptolemaic affairs: Alexandrian Jews support Cleopatra II against Ptolemy VII (Physcon); Egypt and Syria in disarray. Judah Aristobolus, king and high priest (104–103 B.C.); his brutality; succeeded by his brother Alexander Jannaeus (103–76 B.C.). Salome Alexandra queen (76–67 B.C.); her alliance with the Pharisees.
  • Readings:
    Joseph. AJ 13.8.1–16.6; 18.1.2–6 (§13.230–432, 18.9–25; Whiston, 436–54, 585–87); BJ 1.2.3–5.4; 2.8.2–14 (§1.54–119; 2.119–166; Whiston, 672–77, 736–39).
  • JCWNT, 22–25; Green, 535–37; Schürer, 1:200-232; 2:339-55, 381-414, 555-90; 2:413–414, 491–92, 550–554; Anthony J. Saldarini, Pharisees," ABD 5.291–94, 301–303; Gary G. Porton, Sadducees," ABD 5.892–95; John J. Collins, Essenes," ABD 2.619–26.

Examination I
Sat 10 Feb - Tu 13 Feb; Wed 14 Feb (late)

M 12 Feb
No class

W 14 Feb
The Advent of Rome

  • Topics:
    More Ptolemaic and Seleucid misadventures (just read through the material, do not try to grasp it all!). Rome’s expansion in the east: imperialism or entangling alliances? Roman excesses in Asia and Greece, particularly the publicani open the door for Mithridates; Sulla’s brutality to Athens. The Pirate War leads to the lex Gabinia and Pompey’s maius imperium; the lex Manilia gives Pompey the command against a renewed Mithridate and, by extension, a free hand in the east; Pompey’s eastern settlement ends the Seleucid Empire. Crassus and Carrhae (53 B.C.); Cleopatra VII: first Caesar, then Antony; Actium (31 B.C.) and Octavia; the end of the Ptolemies.
  • Readings:
    Ball, 8–15; Green, 537–44, 647–82.

F 16 Feb
Herod's Rise

  • Topics:
    Aristobolus II vs. Hycanus II; Hyrcanus appeals to Pompey, who takes Jerusalem (63 B.C.); the background and role of Antipater; the Decapolis; Gabinius’ intervention against Alexander (57 B.C.); Phasael and Herod receive commands; Herod and the "brigand" Hezekiah; Herod’s trial; Pompey, then Caesar, then "the liberators"; the levy of Cassius on the east; Malchus poisons Antipater; Herod betrothed to Marianne; Parthian invasion under Acorus, Antigonus buys the kingship; the Roman senate proclaims Herod king.
  • Readings:
    Joseph. AJ 14.1.1–14.6 (§1–393; Whiston, 454–84); BJ 1.6.1–14.4 (§120–285; Whiston, 677– 92).
  • Ball, 47–51, 181–97; Richardson, 76–80, 88–130.
  • Schürer, 1:233-42, 267-86.

M 19 Feb
PRESIDENT'S DAY No Class

T 20 Feb
Today is Monday. Herod's Kingdom

  • Topics:
    Herod returns to Galilee and raises and army; rescues family from Masada; failed attack on Jerusalem (39 B.C.). Herod assists Antony against Parthia? Revolts in Galilee and Idumea. Battle for Jerusalem; marries Marianne; with Sossius takes the city (37 B.C.). Disputes with Alexandra; pressure from Cleopatra; the Nabatean War (32–31 B.C.); murder of Hyrcanus II; Herod meets Octavian at Rhodes.
  • Readings:
    Joseph. AJ 14.15.1–15.6.7 (§14.394–15.201; Whiston, 484–507); BJ 1.15.1–20.4 (§286–400; Whiston, 692–702).
  • Richardson, 131–73.
  • Schürer, 1:287-302

W 21 Feb
Herodian Culture and Patronage

  • Topics:
    The building program of Herod; Caesarea and Sebaste; Herod and religion; digression on the birth of Jesus; Herod, patron and client.
  • Readings:
    Joseph. AJ 15.8.5–11.6 (§292–425; Whiston, 513–25); BJ 1.21.1–13 (§401–430; Whiston, 702–705).
  • Ball, 51–53, 177–79; Richardson, 174–215, 240–73, 295–301.
  • Schürer, 258-59, 399-427.

F 23 Feb
Herod and Rome

  • Topics:
    Domestic strife and outrages, including the murder of Mariamne (29 B.C.); marriages and sons; Herod pacifies Batanea, Trachonitis, and Auranitis (24/23 B.C.); visit of Augustus, addition of Gaulanitis and Panias (20 B.C.); second visit to Rome (17 B.C.); more domestic discord; Herod presides over Olympic games (12, perhaps 8, B.C.); out of favor with Augustus, Herod again visits Rome (8 B.C.); more domestic discord; Herod dies in March 4 B.C.).
  • Readings:
    Joseph. AJ 15.7.1–8.14, 16.1.1–17.8.4 (§15.202–91, 16.1–17.205; Whiston, 507–513, 525–71); BJ 1.22.1–33.9 (§431–673; Whiston, 705–27).
  • Richardson, 216–239, 273–94.
  • Schürer, 303-329.

M 26 Feb
Herod's Successors

  • Topics:
    Herod Archelaus: ethnarch of Judea, Samaria, and Idumea (4 B.C.–A.D. 6). Herod Antipas: tetrach of Galilee and Perea (4 BC–AD 39). Herod Philip: tetrarch of Gaulanitis and Trachonitis (4 B.C.–A.D. 33/34). Roman prefects of Judea, Samaria, and Idumea (A.D. 6–41). Digression on the Testimonium Flavianum (Joseph. AJ 18.3.3 [§63–64]). Marcus Julius Agrippa I (Herod Agrippa I): Philip’s tetrarchy A.D. 37 and Antipas’ A.D. 39; king of all greater Judea (A.D. 41–44).
  • Readings:
    Joseph. AJ 17.9.1–18.8.9, 19.4.1–8.3 (§17.206–18.309, 19.236–353; Whiston, 571–609, 630–39); BJ 2.1.1–8.1, 9.1–11.6 (§1–118, 167–222; Whiston, 728–36, 740–44); Acts 12.
  • Ball, 53–56; Richardson, 301–314; 442–454; Smallwood, 144–200. See also Schürer, 1:330–98, 430–54.
  • JCWNT 26-27; Herodian Stemma

W 28 Feb
Philo I

  • Topics:
    The background of Philo Judaeus. The Alexandrian pogrom of A.D. 38; the embassy to Gaius; Philo’s historical and apologetic treatises.
  • Readings:
    Philo, Flacc. (Yonge, 725–41); Legat. (Yonge, 757–790).
  • Euseb. Hist. eccl. 2.18 (Penguin, 54–55); Yonge, xi–xvi; Schenk, 9–23, 49–63; Smallwood, 220–55.

F 02 Mar
Philo II

  • Topics:
    Philo’s Life of Moses; his exposition of the law: On the Creation and On the Special Laws.
  • Readings:
    Philo, Mos. 1–2 (Yonge, 517–59); Opif. (Yonge 3–24); Spec. 1.1–34, 2.11–37, 3.1–3 (§1.1–166, 2.41–223, 3.1–16; Yonge, 534–49, 572–89, 594–95).
  • Schenk 63-65, 99-107

M 05 Mar
Philo III

  • Topics:
    Philo’s allegorical commentaries: Allegorical Interpretation, On the Cherubim, and Who Is the Heir of Divine Things? On the Contemplative Life—part of a historical treatise?
  • Readings:
    Philo, Leg.1.1–3.20 (§1.1–3.61, Yonge, 25–57); Cher. 1–11 (§1–39; Yonge, 80–84); Her. (Yonge, 176–303); Contempl. (Yonge, 698–706).
  • Schenk 108-117.; Complete Philo outlines (v.2, 3/2/07).

W 07 Mar
Nascent Christianity

  • Topics:
    The Historical Jesus; the New Testament church; "Grecians and Hebrews" in Acts 6; Stephen and the Hellenizers? "Jerusalem" versus "Antioch" church? "Pauline" churches? The Tübingen School. Christian and Classical intersections in Acts.
  • Readings:
    Acts; Euseb. Hist. eccl. 1.5–2.25 (Penguin, 17–63)
  • McKechnie, 11–65.
  • ABD3:796-802 Historical Jesus.; NT Sources.

F 09 Mar
New Testament I

  • Topics:
    Paul’s theology and opponents: eschatology in Thessalonika, Judaizers in Galatia, syncretists in Colossae.
  • Readings:
    1 Thessalonians (HCSB with intro, 2005–2010); Galatians (HCSB with intro, 1972–1981); Colossians (HCSB with intro, 1998–2004).
  • See Rel 212 lectures 10, 11, and 19 online (take link at http://erichuntsman.com).
  • Schenk 73-81, 90-91.

M 12 Mar
New Testament II

  • Source Analysis Due.
  • Topics:
    The Jesus tradition in James; theology and thought in Hebrews.
  • Readings:
    James (HCSB with intro, 2052–2058); Hebrews (HCSB with intro, 2035–2051).
  • See Rel 212 lectures 21, 22, 23 online (take link at http://erichuntsman.com).
  • Schenk 81-86.

W 14 Mar
Roman Judea after A.D. 44

  • Topics:
    The prefects of greater Judea (A.D. 44–66); deteriorating relations with Rome; the speech of Agrippa II.
  • Readings:
    Joseph. AJ 19.9.1–20.11.3 (§19.354–20.268; Whiston, 640–61); BJ 2.12.1–16.5 (§223–404; Whiston, 744–57).
  • Smallwood, 256–92.
  • Schurer 1:455 -83

F 16 Mar
The First Jewish Revolt, A.D. 66-73.

  • Topics:
    Events leading up to the revolt; the role of Josephus; the siege of Jotapata and his defection; internecine strife in Jerusalem; Vespasian, proclaimed emperor, leaves his son Titus to prosecute the siege; the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the temple; the Masada "incident."
  • Readings:
    Joseph. BJ 2.2.17–3.9.8, 4.3.4–7.6, 5.9.1–13.7, 6.4.1–5.4, 7.8.1–10.3 (§2.405–3.461, 4.121–439, 5.348–572, 6.220–315, 7.252–436; Whiston, 758–99, 811–28, 865–80, 894–99, 925–35); Euseb. Hist. eccl. 2.26 (Penguin, 63–64).
  • JCWNT, 300–303; Smallwood, 293–339; Huntsman, "And They Cast Lots: Divination, Democracy, and Josephus," BYU Studies 36.3 (1996–7), 365–377.; Schurer 484-513.

M 19 Mar
New Testament III

  • Topics:
    Christians in a hostile world: alienation in 1 Peter and persecution in Revelation. The social situation presupposed by 1 Peter; imperial and other civic cult. Apocalyptic literature. The situation of the seven churches. Interpretive approaches to Revelation. A preterist interpretation: Seals, trumpets, and bowls of destruction—the Great Whore Jerusalem? The dragon and the two beasts, another preterist interpretation.
  • Readings
    : 1 Peter (HCSB with intro, 2059–2066); Revelation (HCSB with intro, 2086–2114).
  • JCWNT, 280–97; see Rel 212 lectures 24, 26–28 online (take link at http://erichuntsman.com).

EXAMINATION 2
Tu 20 - Th 22 Mar; Fri 23 Mar (late day)

W 21 Mar
No Class

F 23 Mar
Jews after Jerusalem

M 26 Mar
New Testament IV.

  • Topics:
    When were the gospels "written?" What were the gospels’ sources? The Synoptic problem. Gospel audiences and focuses.
  • Readings:
    Matt 1–2, 5–7 (HCSB with intro, 1665–70, 1674–80); Mark 14–15 (HCSB with intro, 1722–24, 1751–57); Luke 1–2, 24 (HCSB with intro, 1759–1767, 1811–13); John 1:1–18; 6; 9; 19–21 (HCSB with intro, 1814–17, 1825–28, 1833–34, 1849–54); Euseb. Hist. eccl. 3.24 (Penguin, 86–88).
  • See Rel 211 lectures 5a, 10a, 15a, and 20a online (take link at http://erichuntsman.com).
  • Attridge CRJ 162 162-170; Gospels Overview ppt; Schenk 86-90.

W28Mar Developing New Testament Canon.

  • Topics:
    Qualifications for canonicity: apostolic origin, real or putative; importance of addressed communities; conformity with the rule of faith. Testimonia of apostolic fathers; the Muratorian Canon; Eusebius on accepted books; developing canon in east and west; Athanasius of Alexandria’s Festal Letter.
  • Readings:
    Euseb. Hist. eccl. 3.3, 25 (Penguin, 65–66, 88–89).
  • Duling, 53–58; Brown, INT 3–15; Metzger, CNT, 1–8, 39–40, 191–213 (all online).

Eusebius as a Source.

  • Readings:
    Euseb. Hist. eccl. 1.1–4, 3.25 (Penguin, 1–16, 88–89).
  • Andrew Louth’s introduction to Eusebius (Penguin, ix–xxxv); McKechnie, 102–107.

F 30 Mar
Focus on Writing: Doing an Exegetical Paper.

Su 01 Apr
PALM SUNDAY. Matt 21:1–17; Mark 11:1–11; Luke 19:28–48; John 12:12–19.

M 02 Apr PASSOVER BEGINS AT SUNSET.
The Second Christian Generation; Apostolic Fathers I.

  • Topics:
    The Didache: evidence of a growing institution; 1 Clement: a homily on Christian ministry; The Shepherd of Hermas: an almost-canonical vision; the Jewish-Christian divide.
  • Readings:
    Euseb. Hist. eccl. 3.11–23, 30–32 (Penguin, 79–85, 93–96); Did. (ECW, 185–99); 1 Clem. (ECW, 19–51).
  • JCWNT, 303–307; McKechnie, 67–92.
  • Attridge -CRJ 151-62; Intro to Shepherds of Hermas

W 04 Apr
Growing Christian Diversity.

  • Topics:
    The legacy of Simon Magus; Ebionites, Cerinthus, Nicolaitans. Gnosticism, Montanism, and increasing sectarianism.
  • Readings:
    Euseb. Hist. eccl. 3.26–29 (Penguin, 89–93).
  • McKechnie. 101–102, 151–89.
  • Attridge - CRJ 171-81

Th 05 Apr THE LAST SUPPER AND GETHSEMANE. Matthew 26; Mark 14; Luke 22; John 13:1–18:27.

F 06 Apr GOOD FRIDAY. No class. Matthew 27; Mark 15; Luke 23; John 18:28–19:42; 3 Nephi 8.

Su 08 Apr EASTER. Matthew 28; Mark 16; Luke 24; John 20:1–18.

M 09 Apr
Jews and Rome—Bar Kokhba and Other Revolts.

W 11 Apr
Apostolic Fathers II; Irenaeus.

  • Topics:
    Defending the faith, welcoming martyrdom: the epistles of Ignatius and Polycarp; Justin Martyr; the zeal of Irenaeus; Tertullian.
  • Readings:
    Euseb. Hist. eccl. 3.33–5.28 (Penguin, 96–178); Ign. Eph., Mag., Smyrn., Phld., Rom., and Pol. (ECW, 55–111); Pol. Phil. and Mart. Pol (ECW, 115–135).
  • McKechnie, 93–101; Ehrman, 193–224.

F 13 Apr
Christians and Rome.

  • Topics:
    Growth outside the empire—the case of Edessa.. The complicated story of Roman persecutions within the empire; the changing Roman view of Christians; the systematic persecution of Decius.
  • Readings:
    Euseb. Hist. eccl. 1:13, 3.33, 6.1–7.32 (Penguin, 30–34; 96–97, 179–255); Plin. Ep. 10.96–97 (LR II no. 167).
  • Ball, 87–96; McKechnie, 109–135; Eusebius’ list of persecutions (posted online).

M 16 Apr
The Great Persecution and Constantine.
Exegetical Paper Due.

  • Topics:
    The persecution under Diocletian and Valerian; shifting tides: Constantine’s religious policies; the Edict of Milan and favorable toleration.
  • Readings:
    Euseb. Hist. eccl. 8.1–10.9 (Penguin, 256–333).
  • Ball, 356–59; McKechnie, 217–39.

M 23 Apr FINAL EXAMINATION, 2:30–5:30 P.M.

Announcements and Upcoming Events

Recent Lectures

September 12: “Sitting at the Feet of Jesus,” Time Out for Women, Denver

August 18-21 “Worship: Encountering and Being Transformed by God,” BYU Education Week

August 17 “LDS Christology and the Gospel of John,” BYU Education Week

August 5-11 Aspen Grove Family Camp

April 22: “Grateful for Grace: Appreciating the Saving and Transforming Power of Jesus Christ,” YSA 18th Stake Fireside

April 30: Womens Conference 2015 "Wells of Trust Fanning Flames of Faith"

May 8–9:   “The Search for the ‘Real’ Jesus of Nazareth: The Jesus of Faith, History, and Revelation,” Miller-Eccles Study Group, Fullerton and La Cañada, California

Upcoming Lectures

September 24 Second John A. Widtsoe Symposium, “Religion in the Public Square,” 7:00-9:00, tutor Center Ballroom, USC, Los Angeles (with the following link:

October 9 “The Footsteps of Jesus: Remembering His Miracles,” Cruise Lady Learn Our Religion Series, 7:00, 9118 S Redwood, West Jordan

November 8: “Sitting at the Feet of Jesus,” Time Out for Women, St. George

November 14: “Sitting at the Feet of Jesus,” Time Out for Women, Portland